Getting to know your list members better

Believe it or not, most of your prospects aren’t interested in everything that you decide to send in the context of an e-mail strategy. As you collect contact information and permission, consider asking your prospective subscribers to share their interests. Using interest information allows you to sort your e-mail lists into categories and send information relevant to that category. Asking your prospective subscribers open-ended questions about their interests can prove frustrating because people tend .

Collecting information in person

According to the Ten Foot Rule, whenever anyone is within ten feet of you, ask her for her contact information. A warm body or a verbal conversation can equate to a captive audience for communicating the benefits of joining your e-mail list. Always ask for permission when you collect information in person. Here are some ways to connect and collect without being intrusive: Swap business cards. Ask whether that person’s preferred e-mail address is on .

Building a Quality E-Mail List

Collecting e-mail addresses isn’t an easy task. Some people are so bothered by unsolicited e-mails that they’re willing to share almost anything else with you before they will share their e-mail addresses. Others might give you their e-mail addresses, but when the e-mails they receive from you don’t meet their expectations, they resort to unsubscribing or marking the e-mails as spam, even if they’re loyal customers. Fortunately, an e-mail list needn’t be large to .

Staying Focused on Your Objectives

Losing sight of your objectives usually happens when your timeline slips or when you don’t seem to be progressing toward the achievement of your objectives. In such cases, you can easily become focused on making changes to your objectives to agree with your e-mail content instead of altering your e-mail content to more closely resemble your objectives. Before making changes to your objectives, make sure that you give your e-mail a fair chance to .

Organizing Your E-Mail Content into Themes Based on Objectives

Stating clear objectives gives you a platform for creating e-mail content that accomplishes your objectives. Running a small business involves frequently setting new objectives and developing new e-mail content in line with those objectives. When your time is limited, you might be tempted to create e-mail content that fits your schedule better than your objectives. One of the most important reasons to use specific objectives to guide the creation of your e-mail content is .

Narrowing Your Objectives in Six Steps

Narrowly defined objectives are far more useful than broad-based objectives for making decisions about delivering specific e-mail content. After you define broad-based objectives (as describe in the Developing Objectives in E-mail Marketing), the next step is to restate them in more meaningful ways and match them with specific tasks. You can narrow your broad-based objective by taking six steps: 1. Figure out your ultimate goal. 2. Decide who your customers are. 3. Consider how .

Developing Objectives in E-mail Marketing

The media you use to deliver your marketing messages, such as mobile devices, Web sites, television ads, or postcards, are useless unless you combine them with actions that lead to specific objectives. If you don’t believe, grab a stack of your business cards, set them on your desk, and then wait . . . a long time. Business cards — by themselves — can’t do anything. You need to give them life by handing .

Tips for keeping the practices of EMPs and ISPs

The following sections include tips for keeping up with consumer trends and the practices of the most reputable EMPs and ISPs. Using full disclosure during e-mail address collection The CAN-SPAM Act encourages you to have affirmative consent with your e-mail list subscribers to send them a commercial e-mail, but the most professional practice is to use an extra measure of disclosure when asking for permission. Here are some ways for you to take affirmative .

Determining how your e-mail messages should look

Design elements, such as images and colors, are important parts of every e-mail message because they can reinforce the words that you use or cause your words to feel different to the reader. A text-only e-mail not only fails to reinforce and enhance the value proposition, but it’s also difficult to scan and read. Even simple design elements can have a significant impact on the look and feel of an e-mail message. The formatted .